Saturday, June 10, 2017

Simona Halep in the Final of Roland Garros 2017


Hello, everyone,

Simona Halep's push for Grand Slams and #1 - and I am convinced she has the talent and the shots for all, but she is not training the required variety, simply not preparing properly, to speak openly - has been unfortunately undermined, hamstrung, by years of less-than-optimal development and strategic perspective, and this continues to this day, for in spite of an admirable effort in today's final of Roland Garros 2017 she came again short against a power player.

Today, and as usual, Simona fed Ostapenko a steady diet of topspin balls, exactly what Ostapenko likes. Even more, until too late, she allowed her opponent the initiative in terms of taking the ball on the rise, she staying too far back. Hello?

Today, Simona didn't have variety: no slice. That could have been crucial in taking Ostapenko off her rhythm. Hello?

Today Simona did not take the initiative at the net, by attempting only rarely to come there. Again, that could have been crucial in taking Ostapenko off her rhythm. Hello? Yes, I know she was (to some extent) injured, but those extended and repeated left-right baseline runs were even more taxing.

Today, Simona did not really use effectively the dropshots. Hello? 


Today, Simona's serve was only slightly better than at the beginning of the year, but not to the extent she is capable of. Think about it: Henin at a comparable height had 117 mph, Simona 108. But Henin had a full shoulder-torso-body rotation, brought about by using Sampras's and Federer's platform stance (not the pinpoint stance, used by Halep), just like - surprise, surprise - Bethanie Mattek-Sands (again, same height), the current #1 in doubles, who served 117 mph at this very Roland Garros. Federer's stance also imparts much more work on the ball, making it more difficult to return, and higher trajectory, for more safety.
And Darren Cahill was prompted on this alternative
https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php?threads/great-hope-halep-how-far-now.510359/page-17#post-10690801
close to a year ago.We have heard talk from both him and Simona on serve improvements, but there are no signficant results.

Today, Simona's forehand could have benefitted from a full conversion to the ATP style of forehand, to which Henin switched in order to beat the big girls - and Henin managed to do so. Hello?

Thus, when great titles, glory, and millions are lost - including for coaching - it bears repeating what I have been saying for three years now:

Personally, if I were Halep, with all great results (including on the financial side), which I'd be blind not to see and appreciate, I'd change coaches right now, as I honestly don't see any progress on the crucial technical and strategical side this year:

- STILL no slice

- STILL no volley, no occasional S-V

- not enough dropshots

- STILL no plan B to speak of

- STILL no better serve (just a marginal change: she could not ace Ostapenko much)

- STILL no better conditioning (she entered injured in this tourney as a result of not protecting her ankles with ankle supports)

These are all required to establish clear superiority and domination when one is a player of small height, as Justine Henin and her coach, Carlos Rodriguez, amply demonstrated.

And yes, I appreciate the fact that at least the advice suggested here years ago of hiring a mental coach/psychologist for more clarity of purpose and general winning attitude has been followed (with some very good results).

A bon entendeur, salut!

Marius Hancu
Montreal, Canada

P. S. Congratulations to Ostapenko. With the ratio of winners vs. Halep at 50 to 10 or thereabouts, she was clearly the better prepared player.

Hello, everyone,

Simona Halep's push for Grand Slams and #1 - and I am convinced she has the talent and the shots for all, but she is not training the required variety, simply not preparing properly, to speak openly - has been unfortunately undermined, hamstrung, by years of less-than-optimal development and strategic perspective, and this continues to this day, for in spite of an admirable effort in today's final of Roland Garros 2017 she came again short against a power player.

Today, and as usual, Simona fed Ostapenko a steady diet of topspin balls, exactly what Ostapenko likes. Even more, until too late, she allowed her opponent the initiative in terms of taking the ball on the rise, she staying too far back. Hello?

Today, Simona didn't have variety: no slice. That could have been crucial in taking Ostapenko off her rhythm. Hello?

Today Simona did not take the initiative at the net, by attempting only rarely to come there. Again, that could have been crucial in taking Ostapenko off her rhythm. Hello? Yes, I know she was (to some extent) injured, but those extended and repeated left-right baseline runs were even more taxing.

Today, Simona did not really use effectively the dropshots. Hello?

Today, Simona's serve was only slightly better than at the beginning of the year, but not to the extent she is capable of. Think about it: Henin at a comparable height had 117 mph, Simona 108. But Henin had a full shoulder-torso-body rotation, brought about by using Sampras's and Federer's platform stance. And be on standby on this one.

Today, Simona's forehand could have benefitted from a full conversion to the ATP style of forehand, to which Henin switched in order to beat the big girls - and Henin managed to do so. Hello?

Thus, when great titles, glory, and millions are lost - including for coaching - it bears repeating what I have been saying for three years now:

Personally, if I were Halep, with all great results (including on the financial side), which I'd be blind not to see and appreciate, I'd change coaches right now, as I honestly don't see any progress on the crucial technical and strategical side this year:

- STILL no slice

- STILL no volley, no occasional S-V

- not enough dropshots

- STILL no plan B to speak of

- STILL no better serve (just a marginal change: she could not ace Ostapenko much)

- STILL no better conditioning (she entered injured in this tourney as a result of not protecting her ankles with ankle supports)

These are all required to establish clear superiority and domination when one is a player of small height, as Justine Henin and her coach, Carlos Rodriguez, amply demonstrated.

And yes, I appreciate the fact that at least the advice suggested here years ago of hiring a mental coach/psychologist for more clarity of purpose and general winning attitude has been followed (with some very good results).

A bon entendeur, salut!

Marius Hancu
Montreal, Canada

P. S. Congratulations to Ostapenko. With the ratio of winners vs. Halep at 50 to 10 or thereabouts, she was clearly the better prepared player.
Hello, everyone,

Simona Halep's push for Grand Slams and #1 - and I am convinced she has the talent and the shots for all, but she is not training the required variety, simply not preparing properly, to speak openly - has been unfortunately undermined, hamstrung, by years of less-than-optimal development and strategic perspective, and this continues to this day, for in spite of an admirable effort in today's final of Roland Garros 2017 she came again short against a power player.

Today, and as usual, Simona fed Ostapenko a steady diet of topspin balls, exactly what Ostapenko likes. Even more, until too late, she allowed her opponent the initiative in terms of taking the ball on the rise, she staying too far back. Hello?

Today, Simona didn't have variety: no slice. That could have been crucial in taking Ostapenko off her rhythm. Hello?

Today Simona did not take the initiative at the net, by attempting only rarely to come there. Again, that could have been crucial in taking Ostapenko off her rhythm. Hello? Yes, I know she was (to some extent) injured, but those extended and repeated left-right baseline runs were even more taxing.

Today, Simona did not really use effectively the dropshots. Hello?

Today, Simona's serve was only slightly better than at the beginning of the year, but not to the extent she is capable of. Think about it: Henin at a comparable height had 117 mph, Simona 108. But Henin had a full shoulder-torso-body rotation, brought about by using Sampras's and Federer's platform stance. And be on standby on this one.

Today, Simona's forehand could have benefitted from a full conversion to the ATP style of forehand, to which Henin switched in order to beat the big girls - and Henin managed to do so. Hello?

Thus, when great titles, glory, and millions are lost - including for coaching - it bears repeating what I have been saying for three years now:

Personally, if I were Halep, with all great results (including on the financial side), which I'd be blind not to see and appreciate, I'd change coaches right now, as I honestly don't see any progress on the crucial technical and strategical side this year:

- STILL no slice

- STILL no volley, no occasional S-V

- not enough dropshots

- STILL no plan B to speak of

- STILL no better serve (just a marginal change: she could not ace Ostapenko much)

- STILL no better conditioning (she entered injured in this tourney as a result of not protecting her ankles with ankle supports)

These are all required to establish clear superiority and domination when one is a player of small height, as Justine Henin and her coach, Carlos Rodriguez, amply demonstrated.

And yes, I appreciate the fact that at least the advice suggested here years ago of hiring a mental coach/psychologist for more clarity of purpose and general winning attitude has been followed (with some very good results).

A bon entendeur, salut!

Marius Hancu
Montreal, Canada

P. S. Congratulations to Ostapenko. With the ratio of winners vs. Halep at 50 to 10 or thereabouts, she was clearly the better prepared player.
Hello, everyone,

Simona Halep's push for Grand Slams and #1 - and I am convinced she has the talent and the shots for all, but she is not training the required variety, simply not preparing properly, to speak openly - has been unfortunately undermined, hamstrung, by years of less-than-optimal development and strategic perspective, and this continues to this day, for in spite of an admirable effort in today's final of Roland Garros 2017 she came again short against a power player.

Today, and as usual, Simona fed Ostapenko a steady diet of topspin balls, exactly what Ostapenko likes. Even more, until too late, she allowed her opponent the initiative in terms of taking the ball on the rise, she staying too far back. Hello?

Today, Simona didn't have variety: no slice. That could have been crucial in taking Ostapenko off her rhythm. Hello?

Today Simona did not take the initiative at the net, by attempting only rarely to come there. Again, that could have been crucial in taking Ostapenko off her rhythm. Hello? Yes, I know she was (to some extent) injured, but those extended and repeated left-right baseline runs were even more taxing.

Today, Simona did not really use effectively the dropshots. Hello?

Today, Simona's serve was only slightly better than at the beginning of the year, but not to the extent she is capable of. Think about it: Henin at a comparable height had 117 mph, Simona 108. But Henin had a full shoulder-torso-body rotation, brought about by using Sampras's and Federer's platform stance. And be on standby on this one.

Today, Simona's forehand could have benefitted from a full conversion to the ATP style of forehand, to which Henin switched in order to beat the big girls - and Henin managed to do so. Hello?

Thus, when great titles, glory, and millions are lost - including for coaching - it bears repeating what I have been saying for three years now:

Personally, if I were Halep, with all great results (including on the financial side), which I'd be blind not to see and appreciate, I'd change coaches right now, as I honestly don't see any progress on the crucial technical and strategical side this year:

- STILL no slice

- STILL no volley, no occasional S-V

- not enough dropshots

- STILL no plan B to speak of

- STILL no better serve (just a marginal change: she could not ace Ostapenko much)

- STILL no better conditioning (she entered injured in this tourney as a result of not protecting her ankles with ankle supports)

These are all required to establish clear superiority and domination when one is a player of small height, as Justine Henin and her coach, Carlos Rodriguez, amply demonstrated.

And yes, I appreciate the fact that at least the advice suggested here years ago of hiring a mental coach/psychologist for more clarity of purpose and general winning attitude has been followed (with some very good results).

A bon entendeur, salut!

Marius Hancu
Montreal, Canada

P. S. Congratulations to Ostapenko. With the ratio of winners vs. Halep at 50 to 10 or thereabouts, she was clearly the better prepared player.
Hello, everyone,

Simona Halep's push for Grand Slams and #1 - and I am convinced she has the talent and the shots for all, but she is not training the required variety, simply not preparing properly, to speak openly - has been unfortunately undermined, hamstrung, by years of less-than-optimal development and strategic perspective, and this continues to this day, for in spite of an admirable effort in today's final of Roland Garros 2017 she came again short against a power player.

Today, and as usual, Simona fed Ostapenko a steady diet of topspin balls, exactly what Ostapenko likes. Even more, until too late, she allowed her opponent the initiative in terms of taking the ball on the rise, she staying too far back. Hello?

Today, Simona didn't have variety: no slice. That could have been crucial in taking Ostapenko off her rhythm. Hello?

Today Simona did not take the initiative at the net, by attempting only rarely to come there. Again, that could have been crucial in taking Ostapenko off her rhythm. Hello? Yes, I know she was (to some extent) injured, but those extended and repeated left-right baseline runs were even more taxing.

Today, Simona did not really use effectively the dropshots. Hello?

Today, Simona's serve was only slightly better than at the beginning of the year, but not to the extent she is capable of. Think about it: Henin at a comparable height had 117 mph, Simona 108. But Henin had a full shoulder-torso-body rotation, brought about by using Sampras's and Federer's platform stance. And be on standby on this one.

Today, Simona's forehand could have benefitted from a full conversion to the ATP style of forehand, to which Henin switched in order to beat the big girls - and Henin managed to do so. Hello?

Thus, when great titles, glory, and millions are lost - including for coaching - it bears repeating what I have been saying for three years now:

Personally, if I were Halep, with all great results (including on the financial side), which I'd be blind not to see and appreciate, I'd change coaches right now, as I honestly don't see any progress on the crucial technical and strategical side this year:

- STILL no slice

- STILL no volley, no occasional S-V

- not enough dropshots

- STILL no plan B to speak of

- STILL no better serve (just a marginal change: she could not ace Ostapenko much)

- STILL no better conditioning (she entered injured in this tourney as a result of not protecting her ankles with ankle supports)

These are all required to establish clear superiority and domination when one is a player of small height, as Justine Henin and her coach, Carlos Rodriguez, amply demonstrated.

And yes, I appreciate the fact that at least the advice suggested here years ago of hiring a mental coach/psychologist for more clarity of purpose and general winning attitude has been followed (with some very good results).

A bon entendeur, salut!

Marius Hancu
Montreal, Canada